Laura Purdie Salas

writing the world for kids

Laura Purdie Salas

Misbehaving Magic Wand, by Laura Purdie Salas

November 20, 2014
Laura

Happy Poetry Friday! This is the final poem of 2 weeks of sharing poems from my new 30 Painless Classroom Poems book, Fairy Tale Garage Sale. You know, some days I’m having bad technology days. Like lately, when my car keys, website, and anything else with the slightest whiff of high-tech to it has decided to revolt. That’s kind of how I picture this hapless Fairy Godmother. She probably bought that wand on eBay! This book (and the others in the series) is available in Kindle and paperback, and it includes lots of great extras for teachers!

Magic Wand

 

A Note from the Poet:

In this poem, a lot of the couplets (sets of two rhyming lines) were built around a word I needed to rhyme. I knew Prince Charming needed to be in the poem—of course! So I looked for rhyming words. One option was “alarming.” So I thought about what could happen that could be alarming (startling and a bit scary). That led to my thinking about how everything could go wrong for the poor Fairy Godmother.

 

Fairy Tale Garage SaleFor more Poetry Friday fun, visit Becky at Tapestry of Words for the Poetry Friday Roundup. In fact, since I’m at NCTE in Washington, DC, if someone would be willing to leave my link there, I’d really appreciate it! Thanks:>)

 

Bow-Wow Pirate [15 words or less poems]

November 20, 2014
Laura

 

Photo: Laura Purdie Salas Model: Captain Jack Sparrow

Photo: Laura Purdie Salas
Model: Captain Jack Sparrow

Wake up your poetry brains with 15 Words or Less (guidelines here)!

15WOLs

Here’s Captain Jack on Halloween–he didn’t keep the hat on very long:>) But since he is Captain Jack Sparrow, it seems only fitting to celebrate his piratiness at least once a year! This image makes me think of:

1) Johnny Depp as a dog
2) a pirate dog would dig up his very own skull and crossbones in the yard
3) a dog’s definition of treasure is slightly different from a real pirate’s!

And here’s my first draft.

 

Johnny Depp-Dogg

I’m scraggly-coated…

need a bath…

But my soulful chocolate eyes

will gain your treasure…

 

–Laura Purdie Salas, all rights reserved

Now it’s your turn! Have fun and stick to 15 WORDS OR LESS!  (Title doesn’t count toward word count:>) 

[Note: I’m off to Washington, DC, today to attend the NCTE annual conference. I won’t be able to comment on your poems this week, though they are giving me a good laugh as I read them here in the Chicago airport en route to NCTE. I hope you have a good time with them anyway! See you next week.]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Who’s Going to NCTE?

November 19, 2014
Laura

2014 Annual Convention

I’m packing up today for the NCTE conference! While I’m in DC, I’ll get to see lots of poet friends, catch up with some educators, and even meet up with an editor or two. Can’t wait!

If you’re going to the conference, here are two places you can catch me:

At noon on Saturday, I’ll be signing at the Lerner booth (#313)–with Irene Latham! I believe Lerner will be giving away A ROCK CAN BE… to the first 100 or so people in line (and I think DEAR WANDERING WILDEBEEST, as well). And they’ll be selling A LEAF CAN BE… and WATER CAN BE…. I hope you’ll drop by.

Saturday night from 5:45-7 p.m., the CLA Master Class, which I’m chair of with Janet Wong as co-chair, will take place at Gaylord National Resort Chesapeake J/K/L. The topic is Reading Poetry Across the Curriculum, and we have a stellar lineup of Roundtable Leaders, including educator/bloggers Mary Lee Hahn and Tricia Stohr-Hunt and Heidi Mordhorst–plus more! Don’t miss it if you’re there!

The rest of the time will be a flurry of  attending sessions, meeting/eating with editors and poet friends, and wandering the exhibit halls. If you’re someone I know, and you’re going, and we haven’t made any plans to see each other, I hope you’ll Comment and see if we can figure out a time for our paths to cross.

Out of Time, by Laura Purdie Salas

November 18, 2014
Laura

Hi, teachers! This week, I’m sharing Cinderella poems from my new 30 Painless Classroom Poems book, Fairy Tale Garage Sale. Here’s one from the lady herself.

Out of Time

 

A Note from the Poet:

I love acrostics. They’re one of my favorite poetic forms. Usually, acrostic poems don’t rhyme, but I have fun playing with meter and rhyme in them. I especially had fun with castle/hassle!

[Addendum: In the printed book, the last line does not break onto a second line. But the image template I made for these poems I’m sharing wasn’t wide enough to accommodate the longer line:>( ]

 

 

Fairy Tale Garage Sale

 

Meet My Collaborator, Colby Sharp

November 18, 2014
Laura

So, I’ve introduced you to Ed Spicer, the awesome teacher who wrote the activities for What’s Inside? Poems to Explore the Park,  and to Marcie Flinchum Atkins, who wrote activities for Riddle-ku: Poems for Very Close Reading. I’ve been sharing poems from the third book in my 30 Painless Classroom Poems series, and I’d like you to meet Colby Sharp, who has created the activities for Fairy Tale Garage Sale.

Colby Sharp

Colby Sharp

Colby Sharp

Colby Sharp is a husband, dad, and a third grade teacher. He helps run Nerdy Book Club.

Visit his blog:
mrcolbysharp.com

Check out Nerdy Book Club:
nerdybookclub.wordpress.com/

Follow him on Twitter:
@ColbySharp  

Follow him on Instagram:
instagram.com/colbysharp

Follow him on Pinterest:
pinterest.com/colbysharp/

 

Addendum from Laura Purdie Salas: If you follow Colby Sharp on any kind of social media at all, you can’t help but notice his enthusiasm, his real passion, for books and teaching. One thing he does not really have a passion for, however, is poetry. When I asked if he might be interested in contributing activities, he wrote: “I’d love to play along. Poetry REALLY stresses me out, so I may not be of much help, but I’m always up for trying!” I don’t know if creating these activities led him one step closer to being a poetry convert, but I hope so. I was really excited to have an educator who WASN’T already a poetry lover contribute to this 30 Painless Classroom Poems series.

Colby is exactly the kind of teacher I’m doing these books for—someone who deeply loves books, kids, and teaching, but who gets a panicky feeling, perhaps a deer in the headlights look, when you ask him to teach poetry. So I hope you’ll enjoy his activities for these poems—I sure did!

Here are just two of the activities Colby created for Fairy Tale Garage Sale!

  • Have students draw an outline of the yard sale of a book character. Encourage them to think about what that character’s yard would look like and what items might be included in their yard sale.
  • “Come Again Next Year” – Have students write a letter to next year’s version of themselves. Have them include goals, their favorite things to do, etc. Have students place their letter in an envelope and address it to themselves. Set a reminder in your calendar to mail the letters in exactly one year. You could also use an online tool like FutureMe to have students do this in email form.

Aren’t those great? Some activities relate to specific poems (like the second one above), while others relate to the fairy tale/garage sale theme. Colby came up with all sorts of cool ideas!

I’ll be sharing a few more poems from Fairy Tale Garage Sale this week. I hope if you like them, and you like the sample activities above, you’ll decide to give the whole book a try. It’s available for Kindle and in paperback–if you buy the paperback, you get the Kindle version free.

Fairy Tale Garage Sale

 

Cinderella poem, by Laura Purdie Salas

November 17, 2014
Laura

[Looking for classroom books? I sell signed copies of some of my books on Amazon–personalized to you, your class, etc. Only $13 per book.]

 

Hi, teachers! This week, I’m going to share a few more poems from my new 30 Painless Classroom Poems book, Fairy Tale Garage Sale. The book includes 7 fairy tales, each with an introductory poem and 3 poems from characters selling junk they don’t want/need anymore. Last week, I focused on Jack and the Beanstalk; this week I’m going to share 3 of the 4 Cinderella poems. Here’s the poem that introduces the section.

Cinderella

 

A Note from the Poet:

Not every kid has heard every single fairy tale. So, at the start of each set of poems, I wrote one poem to summarize the important points of the tale. For Cinderella, those key points seemed to be: wicked stepmother and sisters who dream of a royal marriage, Cinderella having to stay home and clean, and that shoe that leads to Cinderella marrying the Prince. As a writer, always think about what your reader might already know and might NOT already know.

 

 

Fairy Tale Garage Sale

Special Saturday Edition: I’m at Will Write for Cookies

November 15, 2014
Laura

Good morning, everybody! I don’t usually post on Saturdays, but it’s a special weekend edition, because I’m being featured over at the lovely Vivian Kirkfield’s Picture Books Help Kids Soar blog as part of her Will Write for Cookies series. Hey, if you change that to cupcakes, I’ll write, sing, dance, do just about anything! Anyway, munch your way on over there if you’d like to read the post. Thanks! Oh, and here’s the brickle picture. As I write this, the pic isn’t showing up in Vivian’s post. I think I sent her a faulty jpg. I’ll resend to her, but, meanwhile, you can drool over its deliciousness here:>)

 

Laura's Brickle (aka Cheater's Brickle)

Laura’s Brickle (aka Cheater’s Brickle)

The World’s Last Magic Bean, by Laura Purdie Salas

November 13, 2014
Laura

Happy Poetry Friday! Today’s poem wraps up a week of poems from my new 30 Painless Classroom Poems book, Fairy Tale Garage Sale. This one comes from Jack himself. As with every good horror story, this fairy tale ends with the seed (literally, in this case) of the next terrible event. I hope you’ve enjoyed this week (except Thursday) of Jack and the Beanstalk poems. This book is available in Kindle and paperback, and it includes lots of great extras for teachers.

The World's Last Magic Bean

 

A Note from the Poet:

Do you know the phrase “Don’t have a cow”? When I was a kid, “have a cow” was slang for “get all upset.” So we would say things like, “My mom’ll have a cow if I don’t unload the dishwasher.” Saying, “Don’t have a cow” to someone was like saying, “Chill out. No big deal.” When I wrote this cinquain (a poem with 5 lines of 2-4-6-8-2 syllables), I had fun playing with literal vs. figurative. Literally, the mom wants to have a cow in exchange for the money. But Jack has bought a bean instead. And figuratively, he knows his mom would be super upset if he planted another magic bean.

Here I am reading both the poem and the Note from the Poet.

Fairy Tale Garage Sale

For more Poetry Friday fun, visit Keri and the Poetry Friday Roundup at Keri Recommends (I love her new blog design). Here’s hoping poetry is offering Keri solace during this sad time for her family.

Enclosure [15 words or less poems]

November 13, 2014
Laura

IMG_8370

Photo: Laura Purdie Salas

 

Wake up your poetry brains with 15 Words or Less (guidelines here)!

15WOLs

It’s another pic from the Walker Art Center’s Outdoor Sculpture Garden. This image makes me think of:

1) a gigantic spiderweb
2) a gerbil in a gerbil ball
3) an alligator caught in a fishing net

And here’s my first draft.

Wrapped

mutant spider
spins her silk—
slowly…
slowly…
slowly…
around alligator’s armored scales

–Laura Purdie Salas, all rights reserved

Now it’s your turn! Have fun and stick to 15 WORDS OR LESS!  (Title doesn’t count toward word count:>) 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Solid Gold Sounds, by Laura Purdie Salas

November 12, 2014
Laura

Today’s poem from my new 30 Painless Classroom Poems book, Fairy Tale Garage Sale, comes from the Ogre’s wife. They have a very traditional marriage, and she’s the one who has to do all the grocery shopping:>)

Solid Gold Sounds

 

Note from the Poet:

 

When poets work on meter, we use symbols like this: -/–/–/–/ Each / is a stressed beat. Each – is an unstressed beat. My last line was “Our grocery bill was much cheaper before!” But the meter, or beat, doesn’t quite work perfectly. Here’s how that last couplet looks, before and after:

 [Addendum: WordPress is combining my dashes. I’ve fixed it now so that the difference is hopefully more obvious!]

before:

I’m-SAD-that-he-DOES-n’t-eat-KIDS-a-ny-MORE

our-GROCE-ry-BILL-was-much-CHEA-per-be-FORE

-/- -/- -/- -/

-/-/- -/- -/

 

after:

I’m-SAD-that-he-DOES-n’t-eat-KIDS-a-ny-MORE

we-PAID-a-lot-LESS-for-our-GROCE-ries-be-FORE

-/- -/- -/- -/

-/- -/- -/- -/

 

Fairy Tale Garage Sale